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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the nickname of downtown scotty brown. then to law school, the army national guard, city and state political office where he was one of just five republicans in a body of 40 in the state senate, and then the u.s. senate. senator brown also famously found time to do a little modeling in his youth and it was through this work that he met his wife gail. i've had the pleasure to get to know scott and gail really well over the last three years. they have two daughters and make an absolutely wonderful family. i'm sure gail, hyla and arianna are very, very proud of scott and just as proud as i am to see his tenure here cut short but they should be proud of the fact that scott has accomplished a lot in three short years here in the senate. he led the charge to repeal a burdensome withholding tax that hurt small businesses, he crafted legislation for crowdfunding which allows job creators to raise start-up funds for their businesses over the internet with less red tape and he introduced legislation to ensure that children's hospitals have access to discounts on orphan drugs that are used to treat rar
responsibility for what happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapable. citizens held the mayor's office accountable for the prosaic tasks of daily life, like trash collection, fixing potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executing strategies for the economic and social advancement of the city. in legislative life, by contrast, we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, cosponsorships, interviews and other means. it takes courage to declare dozens or even hundreds of positions and stand for office knowing that with each position, you are displeasing some group of voters. but we do our country a disservice if we mistake the act of taking positions for governance. they are not the same thing. governance requires adaptation to shifting circumstances. it often requires finding common ground with americans who have a different vision than your own. it requires leaders who believe, like edmond burke, that their first responsibility to their constituents is to apply their best judgment. it is possible to be elected and reelected again and again and gain prominence i
ballooned since the 9/11 attacks. and you're looking at cities that have made up implausible scenarios for terrorist attacks. room to cut? >> guest: i think so, yeah. i'm not an expert in the homeland security area but i'm familiar with the general point and i agree when the federal government starts giving out grants like this, there's lots of room for abuse and made-up roles and made-up responsibilities to try to get federal money. i think that has taken place to some extent in that area and i would take a hard look cutting back. >> host: isabel sawhill, what are you hearing here? >> guest: no one can disagree with the idea we ought to make sure that the government has well-performing programs. i would give the current administration pretty high marks on worrying about that. they have a whole program in place to evaluate programs and where the evidence suggests they're not working, they are trying to cut back or else reform the programs. let me give you an example, the head start program, very popular program, that put use, used as federal money to serve three and 4-year-old kids fro
in my city was fficehat happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapablee citizens have the mayors of thic accountable. trash collection, fixing stree potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executingc strategies, economic and sociali advancement of the city's. w in legislative life, by contrast , we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, co-sponsor shipped in interviewsit, and other means. declared dozens or even hundreds of positions, stand for office d knowing that with the position ou are displacing some group of voters. t we do our country a disservice if we this -- mistake the active taking positions for government. they're not the same thing. ite government requires. adaptation through said -- shifting circumstances.n it also requires finding common ground with americans to have ar different vision than your own. it requires leaders you believet like edmundo burke, that their s first responsibility to their ay constituents is to apply their best judgment. a a is possible to be elected ann reelected again and again and gained prominence in the sena
. what has this city never been able to get the arms around the level of fraud and abuse. what does it say for the expansion of government-one programs? >> well, the fact is that it's expensive to weed out the waste fraud and abuse. it takes an awful lot of government time and money put in to eliminating it. i think it's worth doing it. i don't think we do it nearly enough because if you stop it, and slow it down, then gradually you can retract the government requirement to weed it out. you get rid of it you don't have to pay as much to keep it out as you do to get out, in my opinion. it's been something -- government at times is wasteful in what it doesn't do as much as it is in what it does do. it's never rise tonight top level as i think it should, and hope it does. now one of the reasons i didn't want a government - run option as part of the health care bill because that would have been, in my opinion, a dumping ground for a government program to provide insurance and move away from the private market. i believe in private market for insurance. there's some cases where people ar
. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is
, setting his city on a remarkable path of economic growth and prosperity as well as efficiency. as mayor, he served three terms on the u.s. advisory commission on intergovernmental relations and as president of the national league of cities. it is he have dent as i tell you -- it is evident, as i tell you this, mr. president, that dick lugar always rises to the top of any organization because his colleagues recognize his extraordinary capability and his outstanding leadership. dick's life experiences and characteristic have served the people of indiana and of our country so well. he has been "the" leader in reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. what better tribute? what better legacy could anyone leave the world than to reduce the inventory of these dangerous weapons? the bipartisan partnership he forged in 1991 to destroy these weapons of mass destruction in the former soviet union has resulted in the deactivation of more than 7,500 nuclear warheads that once were aimed at the united states. as chairman of the agriculture committee, dick lugar has led the way
safe home. it's a tremendous organization that serves the greater kansas city area. i've always believed that we change the world one person at a time. and what i say in my visit to safe home was exactly that -- making the difference in a person's life each and every day one person at a time. safe home provides more than a shelter for those needing a place to live to escape from abuse. they provide advocacy and counseling, an in-house attorney, assistance in finding a job. the agency also provides education in the community to prevent abuse -- further abuse, and we often think that it doesn't exist and yet this organization is making clear that the prevalence of domestic violence is known and combatted. each year safe home helps thousands of women and children reestablish their lives without violence. the employees and volunteers there are making that difference that is so important in the lives of so many. after my visit to safe home, a kansan post add question on my facebook wall. mr. bachmann said, if i came away from my safe home visit with any honest sense of how the curren
to overcome an object city national minority -- obstinate minority. cloture is needed, we're told, because members of the minority refuse to stop delaying. but does filing cloture hon a matter, be it a bill, amendment, or conference report, on the very same day the senate is considering that matter indicate a minority that is prolonging debate or does it indicate a majority that is eager not to have a debate at all? to me, a habitual effort to file cloture on a matter as soon as the senate begins to consider the matter indicates the latter. and what do the numbers show about the use of cloture by this democratic majority? according to c.r.s., the current senate majority has filed cloture on a amendmen a matter y same day it considered the matter three and a half more times than the senate republicans did it when they were in the majority. the current democratic majority has done so well over 100 times. to put it another way, senate democrats are much more apt to try to shut off debate on a matter as soon as the senate begins to consider a matter than were previous majorities, including mo
for the senate, a nurse who worked in cambridge, minnesota, a town north of the twin cities, she came to me and she told me that in the hospital she worked in, very often they would admit a senior who was very sick and the doctors would treat this senior and get them back on their feet and send them out, send them home with their prescriptions. and as this started, they would call the drugstore, the pharmacy a few days later, a week later, and say, "is mrs. johnson, has she filled these prescriptions?" and the pharmacist would say, "no." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot
or a particular city looking for that. so i think considering that we tested that we've seen there's enough interest that 30 partnerships would apply for the. that bush is i think the promise of the strategy which has been used in germany of these national manufacturing innovation hubs. and i think that is something that we are going to look to promote in a second term. >> thank you. paul friedman with every child matters. we are very, i applaud you for your comments about not having is fighting against money for children versus money for research and other vital needs. so the question is where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers, stock transactions or other kind of innovative, carbon tax, other kind of approaches were we can find new revenue so that will be possible for us to not fight amongst ourselves for resources? >> well, it's going to shock you for you and industry that i am not here to make news on new revenue. we are busy fighting right now to ensure that we have a budget agreement. it's very balanced and i think part of that balance, having en
we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we look at the data, and in our market the security based market most transactions involve a party that isn't in the u.s.. so this is a cross border market. and how you do the cross border roles is how you do title seven. and so, we felt under those circumstances that when you are looking at the whole, it was important to take a holistic approach the cross border rules and because it was such a significant, had such a significant impact on how they were going to work that we needed to do a formal rulemaking. >> to mr. cook, thank you. i know i am out of time. i'm comfortable with what mr. cook is doing because of the data that you're going to collect. mr. gensler, it makes me a little nervous and particularly because of the different approaches. you know, and there are so many other questions i want to get to. b
somebody that's about to set off a nuclear bomb in the middle of new york city or something like that, you know, in order to be compelling. well, you know, the argument is that if you use racial discrimination in college admissions, um, it's likely that there will be somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations among students and that the african-american kids and the latino kids, you know, who get these preferences are going to say something to the white kids and the asian kids that is, just has overwhelming, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -- which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education, you know, at best, are disputed. you know,
which you find around the world and even here in the united states. there is no major city in the united states does thaf does not have an element of human trafficking and human slavery within its confines. it's important to understand 35 that it is real, that it is happening. to that extent to remember that there are things we're trying to do here in this sledge legislative body in the united states senate and here in washington to deal with this issue. one of the issues we're going to have a chance to do is reauthorizing the trafficking victims protection act, which was sponsored last year by senator brown and senator leahy and hopefully we can finish that before the end of the year but if we can't i hope early in the next congress we'll address it. there are reports that the state department does, ranks countries around the world on the efforts that they're making to deal with human trafficking and ranks them in three tiers. the third tier being the worst, nations that are not doing enough. one of the things i hope we'll look at is how we reform the process of giving some of these cou
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
violations. many people have heard of timbuktu but don't know it's a city in northern mali. in a site where extremists have behaved much like the taliban did in afghanistan before 9/11, destroying sacred and religious historic artifacts, imposing a harsh version of sharia that has meant amputations, stoning, violation of women's rights and free speech and religious free exercise rights, fundamentalling changing the tolerance and inclusive history of mali and creating with it a humanitarian crisis as more than 400,000 malians have fled, either internally displaced within mali or going to neighboring countries with refugees. with growing ties between these terrorists and nigeria, libya and throughout the region, aqim we believe may now use its safe haven in northern mali to plan for regional or trans-national terrorist attacks. and just as we should not have ignored developments in afghanistan which seemed a remote and troubled country when the taliban took it over more than a dozen years ago, so, too, we would ignore the chaos in northern mali at our peril. in fact, secretary clinton has rec
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)